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Wednesday, July 10, 2019

BRITISH INSTITUTE COURSE: IN SEARCH OF YOUR SCOTTISH ANCESTORS




Researching Scottish Ancestors

presented by Christine Woodcock, Director, Genealogy Tours of Scotland.

For details about this course, visit: https://isbgfh.org/cpage.php?pt=74

Watch an overview of this course here

Having trouble deciding if you should attend British Institute this year? Let me share several good reasons to attend!

In-depth learning from the experts: The Institute strives to further your education about the records and the locations that are important to your genealogical research. 

Classes are intentionally small in order for the participants to experience individual instruction

All classes are held in the Plaza hotel next to the Family History Library. Morning classes allow plenty of research time at the library, plus each attendee will receive a 20-minute consultation with the instructor.

Time to informally socialize with genealogists who share your research interests: On Sunday evening there will be an informal get-together to receive name tags and syllabus materials. On Monday evening, there will be a welcome dinner and the opportunity to meet and get to know the attendees and instructors. Dinner is included in the registration fee.

Cost-effective, full-immersion experience! Five days of in-depth exploration of your chosen topic at a premier research facility with discounted room rates in a reserved block of rooms (approximately 75% full currently). Click here for more information on discount lodging.

Ready to register? Register before October 1st for only $449.00 for ISBGFH Members ($479 for Non-Members)



Tuesday, July 09, 2019

British Institute Course: Tracing Your British and Irish Ancestors Using the National Archives






Tracing Your British and Irish Ancestors Using the National Archives

presented by Audrey Collins, Records Specialist - Family History, at The National Archives (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk)

For more information on this course: https://isbgfh.org/cpage.php?pt=74

Watch Audrey's webinar which gives an overview of this class: 

Here's the link to the handout for the overview: 


Having trouble deciding if you should attend British Institute this year? Let me share several good reasons to attend!

  1. In-depth learning from the experts: The Institute strives to further your education about the records and the locations that are important to your genealogical research. 
  2. Classes are intentionally small in order for the participants to experience individual instruction
  3. All classes are held in the Plaza hotel next to the Family History Library. Morning classes allow plenty of research time at the library, plus each attendee will receive a 20-minute consultation with the instructor.
  4. Time to informally socialize with genealogists who share your research interests: On Sunday evening there will be an informal get-together to receive name tags and syllabus materials. 
  5. On Monday evening, there will be a welcome dinner and the opportunity to meet and get to know the attendees and instructors. Dinner is included in the registration fee.
  6. Cost-effective, full-immersion experience! Five days of in-depth exploration of your chosen topic at a premier research facility with discounted room rates.


Ready to register? Register before October 1st for only $449.00 for ISBGFH Members ($479 for Non-Members)

If you haven't made a decision about which class to register for, check out this link for more information!

We look forward to hosting you in Salt Lake City in October!
               

Monday, July 01, 2019

Still Considering Attending British Institute?



Having trouble deciding if you should attend British Institute this year? Let me share several good reasons to attend!

In-depth learning from the experts: The Institute strives to further your education about the records and the locations that are important to your genealogical research. Classes are intentionally small in order for the participants to experience individual instruction

All classes are held in the Plaza hotel next to the Family History Library. Morning classes allow plenty of research time at the library, plus each attendee will receive a 20-minute consultation with the instructor.

Time to informally socialize with genealogists who share your research interests: On Sunday evening there will be an informal get-together to receive name tags and syllabus materials. On Monday evening, there will be a welcome dinner and the opportunity to meet and get to know the attendees and instructors. Dinner is included in the registration fee.

Cost-effective, full-immersion experience! Five days of in-depth exploration of your chosen topic at a premier research facility with discounted room rates.

For the month of July we will highlight each of the four courses, plus an overview of researching at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, beginning with Audrey Collins' course.

If you have decided to attend BI 2019, register before October 1st for only $449.00 for ISBGFH Members ($479 for Non-Members)

If you haven't made a decision, check out this link for more information!

Register for the course of your choice here
                 


Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Call for Webinar Presentations





The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History is seeking Webinar Presenters

Proposals will be accepted June 15-30, 2019

AUDIENCE LEVEL

We are soliciting proposals on topics related to researching ancestors in Wales, Ireland (Republic and/or Northern), England or Scotland. These should be at an intermediate or advanced level as many of our attendees are familiar with the basics of researching in their ancestral country.

SUGGESTED TOPICS

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

·         Emigration/migration/immigration
·         Specific record sets (poor law/court/mental health etc)
·         Military research for British Isles/Ireland
·         Technology for British Isles/Irish research
·         Collections/holdings of an archive/library or family history society in one of the above-named countries
·         Methodology
·         More generalized topics such as writing family histories/creating newsletters/blogging

COMPENSATION

All presenters will be compensated at $150usd or equivalent. This includes pre-presentation preparation, a 3-4 page handout and the actual 50 minute presentation followed by a Q&A

PROPOSALS

Speakers are invited to submit up to four (4) proposals in PDF format
Proposals should include:
·         Topic (no more than 8 words)
·         Description of what will be covered (no more than 100 words)
·         Audience level

Please include a cover with name, contact information, speaking/presentation experience and brief (60 word) bio. If accepted, you will be asked to submit a headshot photo for publication purposes.

Proposals should be sent to: webinars@isbgfh.org


Friday, March 22, 2019

Ireland Land, Property and Estate Records


This course is being taught by David Rencher and Rick Sayres. 

The course is designed to address Irish genealogical research for both the landed and landless families in Ireland. When land records are meager, there are still methods to research the landless in the land records and the associated record fragments created from land use. Assembling this meager evidence provides the clearest picture possible for an Irish family in the 17th to 20th centuries.

Course Outline:

The following topics will be covered over the course of the week:

·       Introduction to Irish Land Records – This session introduces early Irish land law, plantation settlement schemes, the relevant Irish Statutes, Irish Land Commission, the Quit Rent Office, the Land Registry, Registry of Deeds and the Landed Estates Court.

·       Valuation and Tithe Records – An introduction to the various pre and post publication records of the Valuation Office, including the Field, House, Perambulation, Tenure, Quarto, Rent, Mill, Map, and Revision (Cancel) Books.

·       Chasing the Poor and the Landless – The records of the Irish poor are voluminous, but scattered throughout Ireland and England. This session helps you identify appropriate record groups; employ sound strategies; and analyze the records for success.

·      Irish Mapping Tools – Understanding place is fundamental to Irish research. Maps are one of our key tools. This session describes the essential mapping resources needed to research in Ireland. The discussion will include Ordnance Survey maps, valuation maps, and modern GIS tools. Examples of correlation with other information will be demonstrated.

·      Ireland’s Registry of Deeds – A rich source of information for tracing the landed families of Ireland and in many instances, their tenants. Learn about the various major categories of deeds, including sales/conveyances, leases, mortgages, Bills of Discovery, Marriage Settlements and Wills in the registry.

·      Ireland’s Estate Records – Considered the next best source after parish records, the estate records bridge between direct and indirect evidence of relationships and parentage. Discover Ireland’s principle underutilized record collection for Irish genealogy.

·      Reconstructing the Neighborhood for Rural Dwellers – This is a two-hour hands-on workshop to reconstruct and identify the land boundaries for rural Ireland.

·      Reconstructing the Neighborhood for City Dwellers – This is a two-hour hands-on workshop to reconstruct and identify the property boundaries for city dwellers.

·      Plantation and Settlement of 17th Century Ulster – Learn about the confiscation and resettlement of Irish land, the London Companies, the Scottish Connection, Adventurers and Discovers and the effect that migration and emigration had on the people of Northern Ireland.

·       Encumbered Estates Court – The Great Famine brought with it devastation not only in terms of the loss of life and the effects of emigration, but a severe economic crisis on the owners of the great landed estates of Ireland. This session identifies the records and methodology for the post-famine time period.

·       Land Records in the Courts of Law – Disputes over land filled the courts throughout the British Isles. Ireland was no different except with the destruction of many of the court records, the research strategies allow you to follow a different path.

·       Getting it all in Ireland (Sayre)– A case study of mining all the available information in Ireland. Despite significant record loss, there exist an amazing amount of records including Griffith’s Valuation Rolls

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS

David Rencher is employed as the Director, Family History Library and Chief Genealogical Officer for FamilySearch. He graduated from Brigham Young University in 1980 with a B.A. in Family and Local History. A professional genealogist since 1977, he is one of the rare few who have earned both credentials: Accredited Genealogist® with ICAPGen in Ireland research and Certified Genealogist® with the Board for Certification of Genealogists. He serves as the Irish course coordinator and instructor for the Institute of Genealogical and Historical Research, the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, and the British Institute. He is a past-president of the Federation of Genealogical Societies and the Utah Genealogical Association. David is a Fellow of the Utah Genealogical Association and the Irish Genealogical Research Society, London, and is currently an instructor for the British Institute where he also serves as a Trustee of the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History. He currently serves as the VP of Development on the Board of the Federation of Genealogical Societies.


Rick Sayre

Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA, is a long-time researcher and instructor in genealogical topics. He coordinates or co-coordinates a variety of courses at the national institutes (GRIP and SLIG) dealing with land, researching in Washington, D.C. and the law. He also instructs in Advanced Methodology, Techniques and Technology, and Advanced Military courses. His areas of expertise encompass records of the National Archives, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Daughters of the American Revolution, including military records, land records, using maps in genealogy, urban research, Irish research, and government documents. Rick is experienced in the localities of western Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Ireland. Rick is also the president of the Board for the Certification of Genealogists.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Tracing Your British and Irish Ancestors Using The National Archives


This course is being taught by Audrey Collins.


Although we will look at some key record series in detail, this is not the only aim of the course. It’s important to know what to expect from the main record sources, but you should also ask yourself ‘What records will provide the information I need?’ which may produce some surprising answers. 

Knowing a little about how and why records were created, and by whom, will help you understand their strengths and weaknesses, and enable you to use them effectively. You will learn some useful research skills to help you identify, locate and evaluate the various sources that will be useful in your research. 

At the end of the course you should feel confident in using many kinds of records, even those that may be new to you, and may not have been covered in the course. The National Archives and its web site contain a wealth of research advice and historical background material, as well as Discovery, which is much more than just a catalogue to its documentary holdings; it also contains some powerful tools for locating collections and specific records in more than 2,500 other archives.

Suggested prerequisites: 

You should know whether your ancestors came from England, Wales, Scotland or Ireland, and ideally their county of origin. It will be very helpful to you to have a laptop or tablet to bring to the classes, to try out your own searches as you learn. If that isn’t possible you will be able to use the FHL computers.

Time Period: Mainly 18th to 20th Centuries, but we will be looking at some types of record which extend back to the 16th and 17th centuries. Medieval records are not covered, but there will be some guidance on finding out how to pursue research in them.

Each day there will be classroom sessions in the morning, followed by your own research in the Family History Library each afternoon. The sessions will strike a balance between classes on important sets of records in The National Archives, and practical sessions on developing the research skills to use them to best effect.

Course Outline:

All of these topics will be covered over the course of the week

·       The National Archives of where, exactly? The introductory session looks at the somewhat complicated geography of the British Isles, to help you understand which records you might expect to find at The National Archives, which ones will be held elsewhere, and why. ​​

·        An in-depth look at the website and its resources; research guides, tutorials, historical background information, and practical advice on using the records, whether in person or remotely. How to reference the records correctly.

·       Core records for genealogists - census, vital records and probate records in The National Archives. Most are digitised and widely available, but two major record sets are not, with limited online indexes.

·       In-depth use of Discovery, our online catalogue, and the key to our collections; how the catalogue is structured, how to search and browse in it, perform simple and advanced searches, how to re-order and filter results. Then how to view the records you have identified, and/or obtain copies.

·         Armed forces genealogy in The National Archives; service and other records of the army, navy, and other services. A few records date from the 1660s, but the great majority are from the mid-18thcentury or later. There are also records of some related non-military services; coastguard, customs and excise, dockyard employees and the merchant navy.

·       Online records - on our website and with commercial partners. Some of our digitised records are on The National Archives’ site, but many more are on commercial family history sites, or academic sites. 

·       Beyond England and Wales - records for the rest of the British Isles, including Ireland. Many records are UK-wide, and therefore contain information on Ireland, part of the UK until 1922. There are substantial collections of records on the British administration in Ireland.

·       Finding aids and indexes to The National Archives records in print and online. Most records are not digitised, or even catalogued in great detail. But there are still many finding aids and indexes that can help you, in libraries and online.

·       Beyond England and Wales - the former Empire, and the wider world. As a former imperial power, and a major trading nation, people from all parts of the British Isles have travelled all over the world, and settled in other countries, whether temporarily or permanently. People from other countries also settled in Britain, and there are some records of immigration and naturalisation.

·       Records held elsewhere; using the website and Discovery to locate them and combine them with records that you have found in The National Archives in the course of your research. Several formerly separate catalogues are now incorporated in Discovery; A2A (Access to Archives), Archon (Archive contact details) and the National Register of Archives.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR



Audrey Collins is mostly Scottish, partly Irish, and lives in England. She has been researching family history for over 30 years, first as a freelance researcher, but has worked at The National Archives since 2002, and as Family History Specialist since 2009. 

She visits the FHL every year, has recorded classes for the FamilySearch Learning Center, and advised FamilySearch on its British Isles content.

A regular speaker at conferences and events in the UK, US and Canada, she co-wrote ‘Birth, Marriage and Death Records’, and is the author of ‘Tracing Family History at The National Archives’ (in preparation).

Listen to Audrey’s webinar overview of the course: https://youtu.be/QPqC7cIFx1o


Friday, March 08, 2019

Sources for Tracing Pre-Mid 19th Century English Ancestors



The England track is being taught by Paul Blake and Maggie Loughran. The course will concentrate on tracing pre-19th century English ancestors and will be of special interest to those whose ancestors emigrated to North America prior to the commencement of English civil registration in 1837, or those who have already tracked their ancestors back to the early 1800s.

Paul and Maggie will focus on the actual records themselves, giving you an in-depth understanding of them. For each record category, we will be looking at examples of the original documents and guide you through how to interpret, locate and laslty, how to access them using the internet and other available resources.

Course Outline:

The following topics will be covered over the course of the week:

·        Understanding England's place within the British Isles; over a thousand years of civil and ecclesiastical administration.

The structure and organization of English archives, record offices and libraries. How to locate them and access the material they hold.

The records of Catholics and Catholicism, and those produced as a consequence of the Penal Laws.

         Protestant non-conformity; the history and records of those who were not part of the Established Church.

Records of the Parish, including the parish chest; a study of the parish archive.

The parish and relief of the poor; the pre-1834 Poor Laws.

Starting with Domesday Book of 1086, the records of land and property, and the many ways it could be purchased or inherited.

The English manor, a study of its function, proceedings and surviving records relating to its inhabitants as well as the manorial lands themselves.

 London. For over 1,000 years London has been the country's administrative centre with records covering not only its inhabitants but the many who passed through the capital or were involved in its commercial, legal and other activities, wherever they lived.

  
ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS



Paul Blake is an English full-time researcher, lecturer and writer living near London. He was born in Wimbledon where he has lived all his life, so far, and has two daughters. Until 1996, he followed a career as an interior and graphic designer. Paul is a regular contributor to Who Do You Think You Are? magazine and other periodicals, and is the author of several books, some jointly with Maggie Loughran. He has undertaken research for numerous television series including both the British and American series of Who Do You Think You Are?

Paul has over 30 years lecturing and teaching experience, at all levels, throughout the U.K. and overseas; at major conferences (most recently at Secret Live Conference in 2018), as guest lecturer on cruise ships, and appearances on radio and television. With Maggie Loughran, he ran the very successful England track at British Institute in 2013. 


English by birth, Maggie Loughran, is a lecturer, educator and author specializing in British Ancestry. She regularly contributes articles on family and local history to various journals and magazines and is co-author (with Paul Blake) of the best-selling 'Discover Your Roots' (published 2006) and the Unlock the Past Handy Guide Pre-1858 Irish Probate.
She has lectured extensively both in the UK and USA, has been a consultant for the History Channel and organized courses and conferences on family and local history related subjects. Maggie is a past chairman of both local and family history societies and a past administrator of the UK based, Federation of Family History Societies. She has been avidly researching her own family history for nearly 30 years. Her other great passion is her two Clumber Spaniels, Georgie and Bran.

Listen to Paul’s webinar overview of the course:  https://youtu.be/3lG_VM2Hhbw